Bagels, Baseball, and Babies!

Happy weekend, everyone! Mine started out with quite the fun Friday! I spent most of the day with my dad, who had asked me to go on a daddy-daughter bagel date. I think it’s important to keep up any kind of relationship with “dates” or one-on-ones. Sure, it’s fun to go out in groups of friends or with your whole family, but I think the main gems that cement a relationship are those quality one-on-one conversations. I do feel bad for my dad, because I always seem to occupy the majority of our time together with asking him his advice/guidance. It’s kind of funny, because although we are both quite opinionated/strong-willed, to put it mildly, we do get along really well. I think we have empathy for each other, knowing the burden of going through life, never being able to look at a situation without forming an opinion about it and sharing that opinion with everyone, whether they want to know it or not. Hahaha.
Here we are having bagels for brunch after Easter mass last weekend. You’ll have to forgive my dad’s not quite looking at the camera; I made him take the picture, since I’m pretty uncoordinated with the “selfies.” This hat is my newest acquisition in what Jeremiah calls my Ridiculous-Hat Collection. I happen to think they are all lovely, thankyouverymuch, even if especially when they are usually enormous with flowers on them.

Bagel buddies, after Easter mass

Bagel buddies, after Easter mass

Springtime means baseball, and although my sister and I dodged being drafted for tall-girl sports all through school (this wasn’t as hard as we’d like to think, once coaches saw our physical coordination), baseball was the one sport we actually liked. We are pretty decent at it, too, although we never really pursued it much, because we were so serious about our music studies (piano, violin, cello, guitar, hand bells). This limitation was partly because of time commitments, and partly because we had to be so, so careful with our hands; both of us strongly considered being professional musicians for a career.
Now, although we both have pursued other careers, there’s another fear with playing baseball: traumatic brain injury. As any news report will tell you, it’s not a newly occurring phenomenon, but awareness and hopefully prevention have increased lately. It certainly has for our family. With my work with Marianjoy and the Brain Injury Association, I see people all the time who have suffered traumatic brain injuries from sports, including baseball. Having sustained my own traumatic brain injury, I have to be even more careful than other people. I thought this meant staying away from playing baseball or even attending games. Well, I was wrong.
When my dad suggested that our family go see a baseball game together this summer, I was a little hesitant. He suggested we go look at batting helmets. I was so happy at what we found: an adjustable, durable, padded, ventilated helmet–in my favorite color, no less!

Baseball batting helmet victory!

Baseball batting helmet victory!

(Please excuse my dishevelment in the above picture; I had been pulling off and on a lot of different helmets!) As you can see, I was REALLY excited to find this. Ultimately, I ended up getting a helmet with a face cage attached for even more head protection. I chose to post this picture instead, though, since you could barely even see my face with the helmet I got, but I suppose that is the point!

The final selection

The final selection

I think we hit a real “home run” with that purchase. You can buy one here, if you’re interested. My sister actually liked mine so much that she got one herself in silver. So, that was my day in a (pea)nutshell. OK, done with the bad puns now. 😉 Onto poetry!

Today’s NaPoWriMo prompt was a lot easier for me than yesterday’s:

Because I am a rather obvious person at heart, I challenge you to write a cinquain on this, the fifth day of NaPoWriMo. A cinquain is a poem that employs stanzas with five lines. Each line has a certain number of accented or stressed syllables, and a certain number of overall syllables per line. In the “American” cinquain, a form invented by a woman with the highly unfortunate name of Adelaide Crapsey, the number of stresses per line is 1-2-3-4-1, and the number of syllables is 2-4-6-8-2. So the first line would have two syllables, one stressed and one unstressed. The second line would have four syllables, two of which are stressed, and so on. This kind of accent/syllabic verse can be a bit frustrating at first, but it’s useful for learning to sharpen up your language!

I loved the idea of matching the day to the prompt. (Because I didn’t know about the challenge until two days into it, I’ll have to tack on two more days into May to complete it.) Also, I’ve become a big fan of rhythmic forms over the years. It certainly is difficult to cram all of a thought into such a tight format, but I have also found empowerment in constraint. If the thought is too big for the space allowed, well, then, it’s not the right format for the idea. There can be such an explosive effect from a tightly-wrapped kernel of thought, a seed planted into a fertile ground for an idea to blossom. That fertile ground is YOUR mind, dear readers! My kernel for tonight is this little darling right here:

Oreo, sleeping on me

Oreo, sleeping on me

I couldn’t narrow down which version of this poem I liked best. What do you think? Comment and let me know; thanks in advance!

“Oreo”
By: Amanda K. Fowler

1:
Baby’s
sleeping soundly
tiny body bobbing
with the rise and fall of my breath.
This: bliss.

2:
Baby’s
sleeping soundly
tiny body bobbing
with my breath. For him, peace. For me?
Heaven.

3:
Baby’s
sleeping soundly
tiny body bobbing
with the rise, fall: our breath combined.
Heaven.

Thanks again for the input, and enjoy your weekend! 🙂

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10 thoughts on “Bagels, Baseball, and Babies!

  1. I LOVE LOVE LOVE your blog!! I *LOVED* the poem of Oreo, and I was so touched by it. He is such a precious little boy. I also loves the part about us dodging tall girl sports, only to then not be asked because we totally sucked 🙂 I am so proud of you!

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    • Jennifer, thanks so much! I’m so happy you liked the poem about Oreo. Did you have a favorite version, or maybe a combination? He is indeed a precious little boy. ❤
      Hahaha, I'm glad you liked how I described that. It's a good thing it was a conscious choice for us not to do sports, rather than an outright failure, I think. 😉 Hey, moving around complex fingerings for string instruments and lugging our instruments, music stands, and chairs around were workouts of their own, weren't they? 😉

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  2. First things first – I like your first poem about Oreo best!

    As for the dates, it is my pleasure to go AND provide you any insight I may have. You may think you benefit more but you would be surprised to know and see what I learn from you ALL the time!

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    • You are SO sweet, thank you! ❤ I am glad to share my knowledge about nail polish and grammar with you. 😉 In all seriousness, I think our family is blessed always to be able to learn from each other. 🙂

      Thank you for the vote, too! I think the first one was my favorite, too. 🙂

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  4. love this post!!! it is SO important for fathers to take their girls out to show them how their future husband should treat them!!! this makes me happy that you have such a wonderful role model!! now, i know why you are so AMAzE!!!

    Like

    • Thank you, Misty! I hadn’t thought about that, but I totally agree with you! Whomever Jennifer and I date has a tough time measuring up to our dad! I think that good guys will expect that, though. I think a lot of the confidence women can have can come from having a good relationship with their dads.

      And YOU are the one who is AMAZE, my dear! ❤

      Like

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