Merry Christmas: Top Ten Holiday-Spirit Books

Merry Christmas, dear readers! I hope those of you who celebrate it are having a fun time. My family, friends, and coworkers have slowly been celebrating it all month long, and yet I miss it already, and it’s not even over yet! Last night, my family, a couple of coworkers, and I went to the Christmas Eve Mass at the Wheaton Franciscan Sisters’ chapel–the commute from work was fantastic (it’s in the same building…). It was a lovely event with candles, carols, and a nice sermon.

But who’s ready to be done with the Christmas spirit? Not I! The Huffington Post shared a list of their top 12 picks for books that will get you in the holiday spiritI thought that was a wonderful idea, so I also polled my friends as to their top picks. Below, I am posting a conglomeration of their picks. I will note where each is from.
(All pictures are from Amazon. Click to purchase and read summaries.)

The festivity won’t end today, not on this blog! I will continue to sprinkle holiday-related posts through the New Year, so don’t put away the holiday sweaters just yet.

Top Ten Holiday-Spirit Books

1. Winter Dreams, Christmas Love by Mary Francis Shura

Recommended by my coworker Erin

“It is a little-known, wonderful young adult love story,” says Erin. I’ve never heard of this one, but I’d like to check it out. (Used copies of this one may be more affordable than new.)

2. The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg

Recommended by my friend Chris

This children’s book is a hit with all ages, and if you’ve only seen the movie, you owe it to yourself to read this book and experience the quiet majesty in the pages.

3. The Night Before Christmas by Clement Clarke Moore

Recommended by many people–one our dad used to read to Jennifer and me each year on Christmas Eve ❤

This book captures the ageless excitement and anticipation of Christmas, making it more of a family book than a children’s book.

4. The Jesse Tree (by Catherine Fournier) & The Bible

Recommended by my fellow blogger friend Misty

“It is a daily activity starting on Dec 1 that you do with the kids that covers little Bible stories leading up to Jesus’s birth,” Misty explains. “So our main Christmas book would be the Bible. You make handmade ornaments that the kids hang on the tree to help them make a connection with each different story. It’s been really fun this year!” Sounds like a meaningful way to have fun this season. 🙂

5. The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams

Recommended by my friend Amy L.

I couldn’t describe this better than Amazon’s own description: “The Velveteen Rabbit is a timeless tale of friendship, love, acceptance and honesty. When the world seems uncertain, Margery Williams’s classic story reminds all of us what really matters. The Velveteen Rabbit’s journey through love and loneliness to become who he was really meant to be is a story that inspires us all on our own journey to Real.” I cried at this story when I was little; I’m not sure I could even make it through at my age now, since I somehow broke “growing up” and am more sensitive now than when I was younger. 😉
The Christmas theme comes in here because the titular Rabbit is a Christmas present. ❤

6. The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats

Recommended by my friend Amy L.

Amazon’s description is lovely: “No book has captured the magic and sense of possibility of the first snowfall better than The Snowy Day. Universal in its appeal, the story has become a favorite of millions, as it reveals a child’s wonder at a new world, and the hope of capturing and keeping that wonder forever.” Misty says she reads this to her schoolchildren every year. 🙂
We certainly have been having a lot of snow in our region this year, and I will say I miss viewing it with childhood fondness vs. adult frustration. Although, we have been enjoying it this year a bit, with my coworkers throwing the occasional snowball at each other outside, as well as my sister and I having plans to build a real-life–snow version of this, our contest entry for her office’s Christmas party:

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Jennifer (right) and I love our Olaf (recreated from Disney’s Frozen)

7. The Mitten by Jan Brett

Recommended by my friend Amy L.

“Grandmother knits snow-white mittens that Nikki takes on an adventure. Readers will enjoy the charm and humor in the portrayal of the animals as they make room for each newcomer in the mitten and sprawl in the snow after the big sneeze.” -The Horn Book. Sounds adorable. 🙂

8. The Snow Queen by Hans Christian Andersen

Recommended by me

I loved this even before it was a Disney movie. It’s one of my favorite fairy tales, and it holds cultural significance all around the world. It’s especially appropriate during the holiday season, not only for the snow, but also for its feel-good themes. As Amazon describes: “Hans Christian Andersen’s The Snow Queen, the classic tale of friendship, love, and bravery, is full of magic and wonder.”

9. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

Recommended by the Huffington Post

From my last post, you already know how integral this book has become to Christmastime world-round. This classic tale of greed and careful isolation turned to generosity and open love–and the love we get back–is an important reminder to people of all ages about the true meaning of Christmas.

10. The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis

Recommended by the Huffington Post

This classic takes place in a land of eternal winter, frozen scenery and frozen hearts. Ironically, although “it’s always winter and never Christmas,” the themes and triumphs evoke Christmassy feelings.
This is sort of a children’s book, and sort of not. The language, scenery, and plot are accessible for children, and it’s an enjoyable adventure. The deeper symbolism, though, tells of sacrifice, courage, truth, and love–and it’s one of the truest “Christ stories” I’ve ever read.
(A “Christ story,” for lack of a better term, refers to a genre of literature that mirrors Christ’s journey of miraculous birth–or sometimes miraculous rebirth–spreading goodness and love throughout the land. I bet you’ve read many Christ stories without even knowing it–Frank Herbert’s Dune is another example.)
This story will always be special to me because it’s one of the first I read after my Traumatic Brain Injury, and it was inspirational and magical to me. 🙂

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I hope you enjoyed the list, dear readers, and maybe you will consider capping off your Christmas with one of these before bed. Check back on my blog over the next couple of weeks for some more holiday/winter-themed posts. Merry Christmas to all, and to all, a good night!

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